03/05/2014

BEGTSE coral mask Mongolia

 

ETHNOFLORENCE

N 772

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MASK OF THE DAY

Coral Mask of Begtse
Mongolia
Papier-mâché, coral, metal, fabric
C2006.41.1 (HAR 65692)

 

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This  dance mask of the  protector of the world Begtse (Mongolian: Jamsaran) follows typical proportions and ritual conventions.

Despite their difference in religion, culture, and age, many details of this mask can be compared with those of the Nepalese Bhairava mask , particularly the general facial proportions, the rendering and placement of the facial hair, and the skulls used in the crown.

Coral masks of Begtse are  unique to Mongolia, though less than ten original of them are known to still exist.

Begtse gained importance in that region as protector of the Bogda Gegeens, the leaders of Mongolian Buddhism.

Photo credit of

https://www.facebook.com/RubinMuseum

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21/10/2013

RMA Flip Side Text images of the back of Tibetan Objects

ETHNOFLORENCE

POST N 673

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Exhibitions

at the

Rubin Museum of Art

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Flip Side

March 15, 2013 - February 10, 2014

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The texts and images on the back of Tibetan art objects reveal clues to their meaning, function, and historical context. For the first time ever both sides of a select group of scroll paintings (thangkas), sculptures, and initiation cards are explored in detail. Chosen for the beauty, exceptional content, and complexity of their backs, these works of art dating from the 13th to the 19th century illuminate the many uses of the other side in Tibetan culture.

 

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Photo Ethnoflorence 2013

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MASTERWORKS

February 6, 2013 - January 13, 2014

Jewels of the Collection showcases the best of Himalayan art in the Rubin Museum's collection in their international context. This new presentation provides access to old favorites and new acquisitions and gifts. Organized geographically, it sets the diverse regional traditions of western Tibet, central Tibet, eastern Tibet, and Bhutan in relation to the neighboring areas of India, Kashmir, Nepal, China, and Mongolia.

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YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY

NEW MAIN ROOM ENTRANCE

STUFF

 

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Protective Figure

Kinabiggat

Ifugao

Phlippines 

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Philip Guston

Air II 1965 Oil on canvas

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Willem de Kooning

Untitled XIII Oil on canvas

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David Smith

Man and Woman in the Cathedral

Steel

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YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY

INDO PACIFIC COLLECTION

II

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Part I

http://ethnoflorence.skynetblogs.be/archive/2012/11/30/ku...

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31/08/2012

Rubin Museum New York Art of the Kathmandu Valley

FROM THE LAND

OF THE GODS

ART OF THE

KATHMANDU VALLEY

RUBIN MUSEUM

OF HIMALAYAN ART

NEW YORK

 

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ETHNOFLORENCE

2012

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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15/08/2010

NAGA CULT IN THE RURAL AREAS OF TAMIL NADU - THE VILLAGE GODS OF SOUTH INDIA - INDIA FOLK ART A LOST WORLD

    ETHNOFLORENCE

INDIAN AND HIMALAYAN FOLK AND TRIBAL ARTS

2008 2016

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INDIA FOLK ART A LOST WORLD

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ETHNOFLORENCE
INDIAN AND HIMLAYAN FOLK AND TRIBAL ART
ARCHIVE
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ETHNOFLORENCE
INDIAN AND HIMLAYAN FOLK AND TRIBAL ART
ARCHIVE
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COMING SOON
 
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THE VILLAGE GODS OF SOUTH INDIA
 
 
The Grama devatas worship of South India have the extraordinary characteristic of representing the most ancient traditions of the earliest past brought into the vital present.
From the artistic view point the village temples have represented an outstanding expression of forms and sites unique to India and in the history of world art.
According to the opinion of Mr Stephen Inglis the massive terracotta horses of south India  "technically ... are the most ambitious achievements in clay found in India and by any survey probably the largest hollow clay images to be created anywhere" (Stephen R. Inglis, "Night Riders: Massive Temple Figures of Rural Tamil Nadu, in V. Vijayavenugopala (ed.) A Festschrift for Prof. M. Shanmugam Pillai, Madurai University Press, 1980).
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Horses in a village sanctuary of Mariamman Polanalur (Namakkal), cover of the exhibition flyer devoted to the Grama Devatas at The William Benton Museum of Art (1985), Stoors CT, photo by Harry Holtzman; same subject of the Stella Kramrisch's cover catalogue 'Unknwon India Ritual Art in tribe and village' (1968 Philadelphia Museum of Fine Art)
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Offering of votaries, village shrine of Mariamman; Tirripuyanam (Madura), detail, photo by Harry Holtzman, plate IV Stella Kramrisch's catalogue 'Unknown India Ritual Art in Tribe and Village' (1968 Philadelphia Museum of Fine Art)
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Crawling figure, Madura, terracotta h: 11 1/2"
n.104 in the Stella Kramrisch's catalogue 'Unknown India Ritual Art in Tribe and Village' (1968 Philadelphia Museum of Fine Art).
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Votive figure, n. 103 in the Stella Kramrisch's catalogue 'Unknown India Ritual Art in Tribe and Village' (1968 Philadelphia Museum of Fine Art)
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"Village Gods of South India" was an exhibition organized by the Neuberger Museum on the Purchase campus of the State University of New York under the direction of Mr Harry Holtzman and Mr Jeffrey Hoffeld. This exhibition was supported also by Mr John Irwin, at that time keeper of Oriental Art at the Victoria and Albert Museum of London and a foremost authority on Indian art, with a personal contribute, the short but intense text 'Record of a Religion'.
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Head of Hero,  n.105 in Stella Kramrisch's catalogue 'Unknown India Ritual Art in Tribe and Village' (1968 Philadelphia Museum of Fine Art)
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From Indian Earth, 4000 years of terracotta Art, Brooklyn Museum's  exhibition with a section devoted to the Village gods of South India in which were showed photographs and terracotta objects from Harry Holtzman archive and collection.
This Dog figure was present also in the Stella Kramrisch's exhibition 'Unknown India Ritual Art in Tribe and village' with the number 109 of her catalogue.
It come from the Pudukkottai shrine.
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COMING SOON
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THE NAGA CULT IN THE RURAL AREAS OF TAMIL NADU
Photo courtesy of Christa Neuenhofer
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PUTRU AMMAN KOVIL
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PUTRU AMMAN ROAD SIDE SNAKE
WORSHIP
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PUTRU AMMAN SNAKE SHRINE
NEAR
MAMALLAPURAM
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PUTRU AMMAN KOVIL
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PUTRU AMMAN KOVIL
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FLOWERS FOR THE SNAKES IN OLD TERMITE HILLS (PUTRU)
In rural areas of Tamil Nadu, it's possible to meet snakes near ant hills and termite mounds, so both of which are regarded and believed as the entrances to the otherworld, for this reason these mounds are frequently marked with ash; offerings of milk or eggs are made by the devotes to the resident Naga. 
 
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SNAKE SHRINE OM SARI BETWEEN MAMALLAPURAM
AND KANCHIPURAM
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SNAKE SHRINE ON THIRUVAKKALI
TEMPLE
COMPOUND
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THIRUVAKKARAI
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THIRUVAKKARAI
013 THIRUVAKKARAI VAKKRAKALI TEMPLE.jpg
THIRUVAKKARAI
014 THIRUVAKKARAI VAKKRAKALI TEMPLE.jpg
THIRUVAKKARAI
015 SNAKE WORSHIP NEAR KANCHIPURAM.jpg
SNAKE WORSHIP
NEAR
KANCHIPURAM
016 SNAKE RELIEF AT TANJOR TEMPLE.jpg
SNAKE KALI TEMPLE
NEAR
SALEM
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SNAKE KALI TEMPLE
NEAR
SALEM
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SNAKE KALI TEMPLE NEAR
SALEM
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SHIVALAYAM TEMPLE NEAR
SALEM
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NAMANA SAMUDHRAM
AYYANAR TEMPLE
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SNAKES STELES IN KALI TEMPLE
NEAR SALEM
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MUTHIAH SWAMI
MARIAMMAN TEMPLE NEAR
MADURAI
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MUTHIAH SWAMI MARIAMMAN TEMPLE
NEAR MADURAI
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MUTHIAH SWAMI
MARIAMMAN TEMPLE NEAR
MADURAI
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MUTHIAH SWAMI
MARIAMMAN TEMPLE NEAR
MADURAI
Photo courtesy of Christa Neuenhofer
 
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FROM THE LAND OF THE GODS
ART OF THE KATMANDU VALLEY
 
 
FEBRUARY 8, 2008 - MARCH 8, 2011
RUBIN MUSEUM OF ART
NEW YORK
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ETHNOFLORENCE
INDIAN AND HIMALAYAN FOLK AND TRIBAL ART
PHOTO ARCHIVE
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PART I
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PANCHMUKHA BHAIRAVA THE TERRIBLE ONE WITH FIVE FACES
Nepal 14th century
Shiva, in his form as the wrathful Bhairava, a blood sacrifice or alcohol are traditional offering used in the worship of the god.
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The earrings on this sculpture represent Shiva's iconography: a snake for the right and a ring for the left
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Detail
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MAHAKALA
THE GREAT BLACK ONE
Nepal 18th century, Wood
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The wrathful MAHAKALA is a protector of the Katmandu Valley and is practiced by both the Buddhist and Hindu religions.
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Detail
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DURGA
FEARSOME GODDESS
NEPAL 11th century
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copper répousseé
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All three of these medallions depicts goddesses worshiped in the Katmandu Valley almost thousand years ago.
These objects predate the early Malla kings who formally instituited Hinduism in Nepal in the 13th century.
The largest of the medallions offers an intricate depiction of then armed form of Durga.
The other two medallions depict goddesses preforming various movements and hand gesture.
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