19/12/2011

TRIBAL PEOPLE: KHAS or KHUS an HIMALAYAN TRIBE in THE PEOPLE OF INDIA RACES AND TRIBES OF HINDISTAN LONDON 1868

ETHNOFLORENCE

INDIAN AND HIMALAYAN FOLK AND TRIBAL ARTS

2008 - 2016

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KHAS or KHUS

an Himalayan Tribe

  in

THE PEOPLE OF INDIA RACES AND TRIBES OF HINDISTAN LONDON 1868 

 

THE 

PEOPLE OF INDIA.

A SERIES OF

PHOTOGRAPHIC ILLUSTRATIONS.

WITH DESCRIPTIVE LETTERPRESS,

OF

THE RACES AND TRIBES OF HINDUSTAN,

 

ORIGINALLY PREPARED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF

THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA,

AND

REPRODUCED BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR

INDIA IN COUNCIL.

EDITED BY

J. FORBES WATSON AND JOHN WILLIAM KATE

 

VOLUME ONE

 

LONDON 

INDIA MUSEUM,

1868

 

THE HIMALAYAN TRIBES

 

KHAS OR KHUS

 

 

peopleofindiaser02greauoft_0053[1].jpg

 

"THE Kas, or Khus, now the dominant population of Nepal, were, until 1816, the

ruling tribe of the entire tract from the Sutlej to the Teesta.

 

They are called Purbuttiah, or Highlander, from their residence in the Hills ; 

the term being chiefly confined to them, though equally applicable to other 

tribes similarly located.

 

Their aboriginal stock is Turaniam ; a fact, says Hodgson,

" inscribed in characters so plain upon their faces, forms, and languages, that 

we may well dispense with the vain attempt to trace it historically in the meagre 

chronicles of barbarism."

 

When the tide of Musulman conquest and bigotriy, from the twelfth century downwards, 

swept multitudes of the Brahmins from the plains into these hills, they endeavoured to

make the natives converts to Hinduism, and thus to confirm the fleeting influence

which their learning and refinement gave them over an illiterate and barbarous

population.

 

In order to secure their end, they granted to their earliest distinguished

converts, in defiance of the creed they taught, the lofty rank and honours of the

Khastriya order, which they also communicated to their progeny by the Hill-women.

 

Thus originated the now numerous, predominant, and extensively ramified tribe of

the Khas, which, favoured by the Brahminical system, became entirely devoted to

it.

 

Subduing the neighbouring tribes, they "gradually merged the greater part of

their own habits, ideas, and language, but not physiognomy, in those of the

Hindoos, and the Khas language became a corrupt dialect of Hindi," concealing

froom all but curious eyes its barbaric origin.

 

They are excellent soldiers, and form a considerable proportion of the Nipalese

(Goorkha) army.

 

Though more liable to Brahminical prejudices than other military

tribes of the country, they have no religious feelings which prevent them from

becoming excellent servants in arms, and they possess pre-eminently that masculine

energy of character and that love of enteiprise which distinguish so advantageously

the Nipal soldiery.

 

Despatching their meals in half-an-hour, and "satisfying the

ceremonial law by merely washing their hands and face, and taking off their turbans

before cooking, they laugh at the pharisaical rigour of our (Bengal) Sepoys, who

must bathe from head to foot and make puja ere they begin to dress their dinner,

must eat nearly naked in the coldest weather, and cannot be in marching trim

again in less than three hours. 

 

The former will carry several days' provisions on

their backs, the latter would deem such an act intolerably degrading."

 

The present royal family of Nipal belong to the Sahi, or Sah, branch of the

Khas."  

 

 

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